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telemedicine-today:

TeleStroke units improve stroke care in underserved areas
Using telecommunications to connect stroke experts to stroke patients in rural areas continued to improve and sustain stroke care, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.
This is the largest and longest evaluation of telemedicine for stroke and took place in rural Bavaria, Germany. With the tele-medical linked Stroke Units, patients in regional hospitals had around-the-clock access to consultations with vascular neurologists at stroke centers, including evaluation of brain imaging and patient examination via videoconferencing when needed.
Researchers reviewed the use of telemedicine for 10 years and found:
The number of patients receiving the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for ischemic (clot-caused) stroke rose from 2.6 percent to 15.5 percent.
The median time between a patient’s arrival at a regional hospital until tPA was administered fell from 80 minutes to 40 minutes; exceeding American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s “Target: Stroke” goal of treating at least 50 percent of patients within 60 minutes.
The median time between onset of stroke symptoms and receiving tPA fell from 150 minutes to 120 minutes.
Read the article here: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-08-telestroke-underserved-areas.html
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telemedicine-today:

TeleStroke units improve stroke care in underserved areas
Using telecommunications to connect stroke experts to stroke patients in rural areas continued to improve and sustain stroke care, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.
This is the largest and longest evaluation of telemedicine for stroke and took place in rural Bavaria, Germany. With the tele-medical linked Stroke Units, patients in regional hospitals had around-the-clock access to consultations with vascular neurologists at stroke centers, including evaluation of brain imaging and patient examination via videoconferencing when needed.
Researchers reviewed the use of telemedicine for 10 years and found:
The number of patients receiving the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for ischemic (clot-caused) stroke rose from 2.6 percent to 15.5 percent.
The median time between a patient’s arrival at a regional hospital until tPA was administered fell from 80 minutes to 40 minutes; exceeding American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s “Target: Stroke” goal of treating at least 50 percent of patients within 60 minutes.
The median time between onset of stroke symptoms and receiving tPA fell from 150 minutes to 120 minutes.
Read the article here: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-08-telestroke-underserved-areas.html
Zoom Info

telemedicine-today:

TeleStroke units improve stroke care in underserved areas

Using telecommunications to connect stroke experts to stroke patients in rural areas continued to improve and sustain stroke care, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

This is the largest and longest evaluation of telemedicine for stroke and took place in rural Bavaria, Germany. With the tele-medical linked Stroke Units, patients in regional hospitals had around-the-clock access to consultations with vascular neurologists at stroke centers, including evaluation of brain imaging and patient examination via videoconferencing when needed.

Researchers reviewed the use of telemedicine for 10 years and found:

  • The number of patients receiving the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) for ischemic (clot-caused) stroke rose from 2.6 percent to 15.5 percent.
  • The median time between a patient’s arrival at a regional hospital until tPA was administered fell from 80 minutes to 40 minutes; exceeding American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s “Target: Stroke” goal of treating at least 50 percent of patients within 60 minutes.
  • The median time between onset of stroke symptoms and receiving tPA fell from 150 minutes to 120 minutes.

Read the article here: http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-08-telestroke-underserved-areas.html

AMD Global Telemedicine and Vidyo collaborate to improve Web-based clinical telemedicine workflow

telemedicine-today:

image

Chelmsford, MA, and Hackensack, NJ , Aug 18, 2014 - AMD Global Telemedicine Inc. (AMD), the world’s leading supplier of clinical Telemedicine Encounter Management Solutions (TEMS)™, and Vidyo collaborate to improve web-based clinical telemedicine workflow. This announcement of enhanced video…

ucsdhealthsciences:

Happiness in SchizophreniaResearch suggests mental illness doesn’t preclude enjoying life
Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
The study is published online this week in the journal Schizophrenia Research.
“People tend to think that happiness in schizophrenia is an oxymoron,” said senior author Dilip V. Jeste, MD, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences.
“Without discounting the suffering this disease inflicts on people, our study shows that happiness is an attainable goal for at least some schizophrenia patients,” said Jeste, who is also the Estelle and Edgar Levi Chair in Aging and director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging at UC San Diego. “This means we can help make these individuals’ lives happier.”
In a survey of people with the disease, researchers found that 37 percent of patients reported being happy all or most of the time.
Of clinical significance in terms of helping people with mental illness, the patients’ happiness was unrelated to the severity or duration of their illness, to cognitive or physical function or to socioeconomic factors such as age and education, which among healthy adults have been linked to a greater sense of well-being.
Instead, the study shows that happiness among those with chronic forms of schizophrenia is associated with positive psychological and social attributes such as resilience, optimism and lower perceived stress.
The researchers believe that these positive psychosocial attributes could be taught through behavioral modification and mindfulness training techniques.
The study is based on a survey of 72 English-speaking outpatients with schizophrenia in the San Diego area. At the time of the survey, all but nine of the patients were on at least one anti-psychotic medication and 59 percent were residents in assisted-living facilities.
The comparison group for the study included 64 healthy men and women who were part of an ongoing study on successful aging. These participants were not currently using alcohol or illicit substances and did not have diagnoses of dementia or other neurological problems. Participants ranged in age from 23 to 70 years old; the mean age for both groups was 50 years.
The survey probed respondents’ happiness during the previous week, asking them to rate statements such as “I was happy” and “I enjoyed life” on a scale from “never or rarely” to “all or most of the time.”
Responses suggest that about 37 percent of schizophrenia patients were happy most or all of the time, compared with about 83 percent for those in the comparison group.
Approximately 15 percent of schizophrenia patients reported being never or rarely happy. By contrast, none of in the comparison group reported such a low level of happiness for the week prior.
People’s self-reported happiness was then examined in relation to other factors, such as age, gender, education, living situation, medication status, anxiety levels and other mental health metrics, as well as physical health, cognitive function, and a list of “psychosocial factors” that included perceived stress, attitude toward aging, spirituality, optimism, resilience and personal mastery.
“People with schizophrenia are clearly less happy than those in the general population at large, but this is not surprising,” said lead author Barton W. Palmer, PhD, professor in the UC San Diego Department of Psychiatry. “What is impressive is that almost 40 percent of these patients are reporting happiness and that their happiness is associated with positive psychosocial attributes that can be potentially enhanced.”
Image source: happyologist
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ucsdhealthsciences:

Happiness in Schizophrenia
Research suggests mental illness doesn’t preclude enjoying life

Schizophrenia is among the most severe forms of mental illness, yet some people with the disease are as happy as those in good physical and mental health according to a study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

The study is published online this week in the journal Schizophrenia Research.

“People tend to think that happiness in schizophrenia is an oxymoron,” said senior author Dilip V. Jeste, MD, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences.

“Without discounting the suffering this disease inflicts on people, our study shows that happiness is an attainable goal for at least some schizophrenia patients,” said Jeste, who is also the Estelle and Edgar Levi Chair in Aging and director of the Sam and Rose Stein Institute for Research on Aging at UC San Diego. “This means we can help make these individuals’ lives happier.”

In a survey of people with the disease, researchers found that 37 percent of patients reported being happy all or most of the time.

Of clinical significance in terms of helping people with mental illness, the patients’ happiness was unrelated to the severity or duration of their illness, to cognitive or physical function or to socioeconomic factors such as age and education, which among healthy adults have been linked to a greater sense of well-being.

Instead, the study shows that happiness among those with chronic forms of schizophrenia is associated with positive psychological and social attributes such as resilience, optimism and lower perceived stress.

The researchers believe that these positive psychosocial attributes could be taught through behavioral modification and mindfulness training techniques.

The study is based on a survey of 72 English-speaking outpatients with schizophrenia in the San Diego area. At the time of the survey, all but nine of the patients were on at least one anti-psychotic medication and 59 percent were residents in assisted-living facilities.

The comparison group for the study included 64 healthy men and women who were part of an ongoing study on successful aging. These participants were not currently using alcohol or illicit substances and did not have diagnoses of dementia or other neurological problems. Participants ranged in age from 23 to 70 years old; the mean age for both groups was 50 years.

The survey probed respondents’ happiness during the previous week, asking them to rate statements such as “I was happy” and “I enjoyed life” on a scale from “never or rarely” to “all or most of the time.”

Responses suggest that about 37 percent of schizophrenia patients were happy most or all of the time, compared with about 83 percent for those in the comparison group.

Approximately 15 percent of schizophrenia patients reported being never or rarely happy. By contrast, none of in the comparison group reported such a low level of happiness for the week prior.

People’s self-reported happiness was then examined in relation to other factors, such as age, gender, education, living situation, medication status, anxiety levels and other mental health metrics, as well as physical health, cognitive function, and a list of “psychosocial factors” that included perceived stress, attitude toward aging, spirituality, optimism, resilience and personal mastery.

“People with schizophrenia are clearly less happy than those in the general population at large, but this is not surprising,” said lead author Barton W. Palmer, PhD, professor in the UC San Diego Department of Psychiatry. “What is impressive is that almost 40 percent of these patients are reporting happiness and that their happiness is associated with positive psychosocial attributes that can be potentially enhanced.”

Image source: happyologist

emergentfutures:

Do quantum computers threaten global encryption systems?

Make a mobile phone call and encryption is there to stop eavesdroppers listening in.

Spend money online and encryption ensures your card number and identity cannot be scooped up and used elsewhere.

And the money that keeps global banking systems lubricated only does so thanks to cryptographic software that turns a stream of data into unintelligible nonsense.

Remove all that encryption and the whole lot comes tumbling down.

If that happens we might return to an era when commerce was mostly done face-to-face and based around who you know.

Full Story: BBC

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